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A fit, healthy body—that is the best fashion statement

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Please, touch me, I pray.

Desire    Friendship    Funny    Girl    Hip hop    Honesty    Humor    Humour    Imagination    Individuality    Life    Love    Lust    Lust for life    Music    Novel    Passion    Reality    Relationships    Romance    Self    Sex    Truth    Wisdom    Young    Young adult    Young adult fiction    Young adult literature    Young adult novels    Young adults

As a child, I read because books–violent and not, blasphemous and not, terrifying and not–were the most loving and trustworthy things in my life. I read widely, and loved plenty of the classics so, yes, I recognized the domestic terrors faced by Louisa May Alcott’s March sisters. But I became the kid chased by werewolves, vampires, and evil clowns in Stephen King’s books. I read books about monsters and monstrous things, often written with monstrous language, because they taught me how to battle the real monsters in my life.
And now I write books for teenagers because I vividly remember what it felt like to be a teen facing everyday and epic dangers. I don’t write to protect them. It’s far too late for that. I write to give them weapons–in the form of words and ideas-that will help them fight their monsters. I write in blood because I remember what it felt like to bleed.

Too many adults wish to 'protect' teenagers when they should be stimulating them to read of life as it is lived.

Anya looked upon Nin admirably. Having him as a partner-in-crime—if only on this one occasion, which she hoped would only be the start of something more—was more revitalizing than the cheap thrills of a cookie-cutter shallow, superficial romance, where the top priority was how beautiful a person was on the outside.

Esperanza leaned around the side of the truck. As they rounded a curve, it appeared as if the mountains pulled away from each other, like a curtain opening on stage, revealing the San Joaquin Valley beyond. Flat and spacious, it spread out like a blanket of patchwork fields. Esperanza could see no end to the plots of yellow, brown, and shades of green. The road finally leveled out on the valley floor, and she gazed back at the mountains from where they'd come. They looked like monstrous lions' paws resting at the edge of ridge.

Esperanza Rising

Pam Muñoz Ryan

Esperanza Rising

Because of you, Michael, my heart begins to grow wings.

He speaks in that strange sports talk, telling me about the start of the new season and asks if I follow baseball.
No. I really don’t.
He assures me if I stay in town long enough I will become a baseball fan. It’s a requirement of living in St. Louis. Everyone is a Cardinal’s fan.
Loyal, he tells me. St. Louis is a loyal town.

Everybody knows, nobody's talking - from LIE --debut novel coming September 1st from St. Martin's Press

In 1938, Louise Rosenblatt introduced reader response theory or the transactional view of reading. She asserted that what the reader brings to the reading act - his or her world of experiences, personality, and current frame of mind - is just as important in interpreting the text as what the author writes. According to this view, reading is a fusion of text and reader.

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