Pride and Prejudice

By Jane Austen

Pride and Prejudice

 4.3 

Pride and Prejudice

16 Quotes    4.3 

Pride and Prejudice has remained one of the most popular novels in the English language, since its immediate success in 1813. Jane Austen called this brilliant work "her own dear child" and her vivacious heroine, Elizabeth Bennet, "as delightful a creature as ever appeared in print." A splendid perf... ormance of civilized sparring is the romantic clash between the thought-provoking Elizabeth and her proud beauty, Mr. Darcy. And the radiant wit of Jane Austen glistens as her characters dance a delicate quadrilla of flirtation and intrigue, making this book Regency England's most superb comedy of manners.

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Pride and Prejudice

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333 Pages
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Quotes from Pride and Prejudice

In vain have I struggled. It will not do. My feelings will not be repressed. You must allow me to tell you how ardently I admire and love you.

Occupied in observing Mr. Bingley’s attentions to her sister, Elizabeth was far from suspecting that she was herself becoming an object of some interest in the eyes of his friend. Mr. Darcy had at first scarcely allowed her to be pretty: he had looked at her without admiration at the ball; and when they next met, he looked at her only to criticise. But no sooner had he made it clear to himself and his friends that she had hardly a good feature in her face, than he began to find it was rendered uncommonly intelligent by the beautiful expression of her dark eyes. To this discovery succeeded some others equally mortifying. Though he had detected with a critical eye more than one failure of perfect symmetry in her form, he was forced to acknowledge her figure to be light and pleasing; and in spite of his asserting that her manners were not those of the fashionable world, he was caught by their easy playfulness. Of this she was perfectly unaware: to her he was only the man who made himself agreeable nowhere, and who had not thought her handsome enough to dance with.

Happiness in marriage is entirely a matter of chance. If the dispositions of the parties are ever so well known to each other or ever so similar beforehand, it does not advance their felicity in the least. They always continue to grow sufficiently unlike afterwards to have their share of vexation; and it is better to know as little as possible of the defects of the person with whom you are to pass your life.

Laugh as much as you choose, but you will not laugh me out of my opinion.

Adieu to disappointment and spleen. What are men to rocks and mountains?

Miss Bingley was very deeply mortified by Darcy's marriage; but as she thought it advisable to retain the right of visiting at Pemberley, she dropt all her resentment; was fonder than ever of Georgiana, almost as attentive to Darcy as heretofore, and paid off every arrear of civility to Elizabeth.
Pemberley was now Georgiana's home; and the attachment of the sisters was exactly what Darcy had hoped to see. They were able to love each other, even as well as they intended. Georgiana had the highest opinion in the world of Elizabeth; though at first she often listened with an astonishment bordering on alarm at her lively, sportive manner of talking to her brother. He, who had always inspired in herself a respect which almost overcame her affection, she now saw the object of open pleasantry. Her mind received knowledge which had never before fallen in her way. By Elizabeth's instructions she began to comprehend that a woman may take liberties with her husband which a brother will not always allow in a sister more than ten years younger than himself.
Lady Catherine was extremely indignant on the marriage of her nephew; and as she gave way to all the genuine frankness of her character, in her reply to the letter which announced its arrangement, she sent him language so very abusive, especially of Elizabeth, that for some time all intercourse was at an end. But at length, by Elizabeth's persuasion, he was prevailed on to overlook the offence, and seek a reconciliation; and, after a little farther resistance on the part of his aunt, her resentment gave way, either to her affection for him, or her curiosity to see how his wife conducted herself: and she condescended to wait on them at Pemberley, in spite of that pollution which its woods had received, not merely from the presence of such a mistress, but the visits of her uncle and aunt from the city.
With the Gardiners they were always on the most intimate terms. Darcy, as well as Elizabeth, really loved them; and they were both ever sensible of the warmest gratitude towards the persons who, by bringing her into Derbyshire, had been the means of uniting them.

Reviews of Pride and Prejudice

I strongly suggest everybody to read this book - maybe it will be hard at first but it will definitely be worth it!

This is the best book to illustrate the negative effect of pride and prejudice when it comes to the relations between people, and it combines knowledge of life with a dynamic plot.

If I'm ever stranded on our imaginary desert isle I hope I have a trunkful of books. But if I can only take one I think Pride and Prejudice just might be it.

...Jane Austen’s most popular book actually offers a witty, insightful, and surprisingly realistic look at what marriage is and ought to be—even some two hundred years after its publication.

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