10 4.3

Love

Author Roddy Doyle

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Genres :Fiction , Childrens , Literary Fiction , Love , Children's Picture Books
Published By : Viking
Published On : Jun 23, 2020
ISBN : (ISBN13: 9781984880451)
Format :Hardcover
Language :English
No. of pages : 336
  • Copy


    “Young people, Lord. Do they still call it infatuation? That magic ax that chops away the world in one blow, leaving only the couple standing there trembling? Whatever they call it, it leaps over anything, takes the biggest chair, the largest slice, rules the ground wherever it walks, from a mansion to a swamp, and its selfishness is its beauty. Before I was reduced to singsong, I saw all kinds of mating. Most are two-night stands trying to last a season. Some, the riptide ones, claim exclusive right to the real name, even though everybody drowns in its wake. People with no imagination feed it with sex—the clown of love. They don’t know the real kinds, the better kinds, where losses are cut and everybody benefits. It takes a certain intelligence to love like that—softly, without props. But the world is such a showpiece, maybe that’s why folks try to outdo it, put everything they feel onstage just to prove they can think up things too: handsome scary things like fights to the death, adultery, setting sheets afire. They fail, of course. The world outdoes them every time. While they are busy showing off, digging other people’s graves, hanging themselves on a cross, running wild in the streets, cherries are quietly turning from greed to red, oysters are suffering pearls, and children are catching rain in their mouths expecting the drops to be cold but they’re not; they are warm and smell like pineapple before they get heavier and heavier, so heavy and fast they can’t be caught one at a time. Poor swimmers head for shore while strong ones wait for lightning’s silver veins. Bottle-green clouds sweep in, pushing the rain inland where palm trees pretend to be shocked by the wind. Women scatter shielding their hair and men bend low holding the women’s shoulders against their chests. I run too, finally. I say finally because I do like a good storm. I would be one of those people in the weather channel leaning into the wind while lawmen shout in megaphones: ‘Get moving!”
  • Copy


    “Do they still call it infatuation? That magic ax that chops away the world in one blow, leaving only the couple standing there trembling? Whatever they call it, it leaps over anything, takes the biggest chair, the largest slice, rules the ground wherever it walks, from a mansion to a swamp, and its selfishness is its beauty.... People with no imagination feed it with sex -- the clown of love. They don't know the real kinds, the better kinds, where losses are cut and everybody benefits. It takes a certain intelligence to love like that -- softly, without props.”
  • Copy


    “I know it's trash: just another story made up to scare wicked females and correct unruly children. But it's all I have. I know I need something else. Something better. Like a story that shows how brazen women can take a good man down. I can hum to that.”
  • Copy


    “Lying on a ring of onion, a tomato slice exposed its seedy smile, one she remembers to this moment.”

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  • As Junior expertly seduces Romen, the adolescent grandson of Sandler and Vida Gibbons (both of whom had been employed by Cosey), Christine’s rage, May’s paranoid fear of racial unrest as a threat to her security (“for years, she hoarded and buried, and preserved and stole”), and the frail heed’s ...

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  • Love by Toni Morrison Chatto & Windus £16.99, pp212 Love is conspicuously absent from Toni Morrison's eighth novel.

    Nov 16, 2003 Read full review
  • In the diaries, her mother indicated that she felt she was writing the diaries to some day be read and shared, and that is what her daughter has done with this book.

    Dec 11, 2012 Read full review
  • It wouldn't be a Morrison novel without a heavy William Faulkner influence and, with much of the story's action being recollected years after it took place along with Bill and Heed's similarities to Thomas and Rose Supten, the Faulkner novel she's been reading for this book is Absalom Absalom.

    Jan 18, 2006 Read full review
  • In a recent interview Morrison said, "I was interested in the way in which sexual love and other kinds of love lend themselves to betrayal.

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